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Scottie Scheffler Makes History, Winning the Title at Sawgrass

Ranked number one globally and having undergone neck treatment during the second round, Scheffler fired an impressive eight-under 64 to claim victory at the 50th edition of the PGA Tour's premier event.

Scottie Scheffler Makes History, Winning the Title at Sawgrass
Scottie Scheffler Makes History, Winning the Title at Sawgrass

Battling a neck injury and a significant five-shot deficit in the final round, Scottie Scheffler achieved a historic feat by defending his title at the Players Championship, becoming the first player ever to do so. Congratulations to those who had successful bets on the Players Championship!

Ranked number one globally and having undergone neck treatment during the second round, Scheffler fired an impressive eight-under 64 to claim victory at the 50th edition of the PGA Tour's premier event.

He edged out by a single stroke at 20 under par, fellow Americans Brian Harman, Wyndham Clark, and Xander Schauffele, in a gripping conclusion in Florida that saw all three miss critical putts that could have extended the competition.

In a dramatic sequence at the 18th, Harman's 17-foot birdie attempt veered off, concluding his round at 68. Schauffele, who had been leading until the final stages, missed a long 60-foot putt, finishing with a 70, and Clark, the US Open champion, saw his 17-footer loop out, ending with a 69.

Reflecting on the monumental achievement of back-to-back Players titles, Scheffler remarked, "It's pretty special. It's something you don't get the opportunity to do very often. It's tough enough to win one."

At 27, Scheffler became the youngest to clinch two titles, a record only surpassed by Jack Nicklaus's three victories. His eighth PGA Tour win, coming on the heels of a triumph at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, was particularly remarkable given the severe neck pain he endured during the second round's play on Friday.

Despite the discomfort, which necessitated on-course physiotherapy, Scheffler persevered, stating, "I didn't want to give up in the tournament. I did what I could to hang around until my neck got better and [on Sunday] it felt really good."

Scheffler's victory was not just about overcoming physical adversity but also about a spectacular final round where he erased Schauffele's lead by the ninth hole, highlighted by a chip-in eagle on the fourth and a series of birdies that saw him match the record comebacks by Justin Leonard in 1998 and Henrik Stenson in 2009.

The tournament's final stages were marked by intense competition among Scheffler, Schauffele, and Clark, with the lead changing hands multiple times. However, strategic birdies by Scheffler and slip-ups by Schauffele and Clark sealed the historic win for Scheffler.

Despite their efforts and notable performances, including Harman's ascent on the leaderboard and their stellar plays on the 16th and the challenging 17th 'island hole', Schauffele and Clark couldn't secure the birdies needed on the final hole to tie with Scheffler.

Schauffele expressed his disappointment, stating, "When I went to bed last night, it's not exactly how I envisioned walking off the 18th green. This sucks but I'll lick my wounds and right back to it next week."